Discussion:
Bully's approach Re: Rex Tillerson.... telling Kim...the US is changing its policy...looking at effective options to deal with N Korea...including a military option
(too old to reply)
lo yeeOn
2017-03-21 21:28:48 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
S. Brian Willson traveled 900 ground miles through six of North
Korea's nine provinces, as well as Pyongyang, the capital, and
several other cities, talking with dozens of people from all walks
of life; all wanted to know about the "axis of evil" speech.

He found that North Koreans "simply cannot understand why the US is
so obsessed with them."
North Korea is a failure. They cannot raise food. They jail people and
execute people. They have no electricity.
If you want to be taken seriously, cite some sources so we can read
and decide for ourselves. No electricity? Then they can't have an
orchestra and get together and play a concert. A certain Polish or
German conductor has been cited by the BBC news for repeatedly going
back to North Korea for musical purposes. If they "have no
electricity" as you claimed, how do they rehearse and play a concert
together? Most conductors conduct with scores in front of them and
the musicians do not play ensemble music by heart. Also, all the
pictures from the BBC news I have seen show North Koreans looking
strong and healthy and their women looking very pretty, with a more
chiseled look than other Far East Asian women. You can't be starving
and looking good at the same time!
North Korean guards kill Chinese and Communists do nothing.
This is sensationalism. If it was a random crime, it could occur
anywhere on this planet. If it is a systematic thing, the Chinese
wouldn't stand for it. (Cf. the rape cases in South Korea and Japan's
Okinawa leveled against US soldiers.)

Lastly, if the propaganda that "North Korea or whoever is ruling it is
a monster" holds any currency for the US politicians, it's only
because getting into China is Washington's long term goal - its real
aim. China has stuff and North Korea doesn't. Also, once the US has
access to NK, Russia is not far behind to see a foreign invasion.
That's the beginning and the end of the North Korea story.

The US should negotiate a peace treaty with NK and forget about war
with it. We have killed too many Korean people already.

Now Let's read Kevin Zeese and Margaret Flowers'
"The U.S. and North Korea: Will the Real Aggressor Please Stand Down!"

[The] historical context results in North Korea taking the threats
of the United States very seriously. It knows the US has been
willing to kill large portions of its population throughout history
and has seen what the US has done to other countries.

In 2002, President George W. Bush labeled North Korea part of the
"axis of evil" along with Iraq and Iran. S. Brian Willson traveled
900 ground miles through six of North Korea's nine provinces, as
well as Pyongyang, the capital, and several other cities, talking
with dozens of people from all walks of life; all wanted to know
about the "axis of evil" speech. He found that North Koreans
"simply cannot understand why the US is so obsessed with them."

Of course, the North Korean government witnessed the "shock and awe"
campaign of bombardments against Iraq and the killing of at least
hundreds of thousands . . .

Should we have to be reminded of the hundreds of thousands of innocent
victims of Hiroshima and Nagasaki who lived and died not far from the
homeland of the Koreans, north or south?

Did these victims of our atom bombs offend us Americans in any way
that could ever justify their horrible and painful deaths?

So, who are the monsters? Comparing George W Bush and his cabal and
the Kims and their henchmen, the choice is clear, if it is a binary
forced choice kind of answer you're asked to provide.

lo yeeOn

--------

North Korea and the United States: Will the Real Aggressor Please
Stand Down?

Kevin Zeese and Margaret Flowers, March 05, 2013

http://antiwar.com/blog/2013/03/05/north-korea-and-the-united-states-will-the-real-aggressor-please-stand-down/

Near the end of World War II, as Japan was weakened, Korean "People's
Committees" formed all over the country and Korean exiles returned
from China, the US and Russia to prepare for independence and
democratic rule. On September 6, 1945, these disparate forces and
representatives of the people's committees proclaimed a Korean
People's Republic (the KPR) with a progressive agenda of land reform,
rent control, an eight-hour work day and minimum wage among its
27-point program.

But the KPR was prevented from becoming a reality. Instead, after
World War II and without Korean representation, the US quite
arbitrarily decided with Russia, China and England, to divide Korea
into two nations "temporarily" as part of its decolonization. The
powers agreed that Japan should lose all of its colonies and that in
"due course" Korea would be free. Korea was divided on the 38th
parallel. The US made sure to keep the capital, Seoul, and key ports.
Essentially, the US took as much of Korea as it thought the Russians
would allow. This division planted the seeds of the Korean War,
causing a five-year revolution and counter-revolution that escalated
into the Korean War.

Initially, the South Koreans welcomed the United States, but US
Gen. John Hodge, the military governor of South Korea working under
Gen. Douglas MacArthur, quickly brought Koreans who had cooperated
with the Japanese during occupation into the government and shut out
Koreans seeking democracy. He refused to meet with representatives of
the KPR and banned the party, working instead with the right wing
Korean Democratic Party - made up of landlords, land owners, business
interests and pro-Japanese collaborators.

Shut out of politics, Koreans who sought an independent democratic
state took to other methods and a mass uprising occurred. A strike
against the railroads in September 1946 by 8,000 railway workers in
Pusan quickly grew into a general strike of workers and students in
all of the South's major cities. The US military arrested strike
leaders en masse. In Taegu, on Oct. 1, huge riots occurred after
police smashed picket lines and fired into a crowd of student
demonstrators, killing three and wounding scores. In Yongchon, on
Oct. 3, 10,000 people attacked the police station and killed more than
40 police, including the county chief. Some 20 landlords and
pro-Japanese officials were also killed. A few days later, the US
military declared martial law to crush the uprising. They fired into
large crowds of demonstrators in numerous cities and towns, killing
and wounding an unknown number of people.

Syngman Rhee, an exile who had lived in the US for 40 years, was
returned to Korea on MacArthur's personal plane. He initially allied
with left leaders to form a government approved of by the US. Then in
1947, he dispensed with his "left" allies by assassinating their
leaders, Kim Ku and Kim Kyu-Shik. Rhee consolidated power and the US
pushed for United Nations-sponsored elections in May 1948 to put a
legal imprimatur on the divided Koreas. Rhee was elected at 71 years
old in an election boycotted by most parties who saw it as sham. He
came to power in the midst of an insurgency.

On Jeju Island, the largest Korean island lying in a strategic
location in the Korea Strait, there continued to be protests against
the US military government. It was one of the last areas where
people's committees continued to exist. Gen. Hodge told Congress Jeju
was a truly communal area that is peacefully controlled by the
People's Committee," but he organized its extermination in a
scorched-earth attack.

In September, Rhee's new government launched a massive
counterinsurgency operation under US command. S. Brian Willson
reports it resulted in the killing of "60,000 Islanders, with another
40,000 desperately fleeing in boats to Japan. Thus, one-third of its
residents were either murdered or fled during the 'extermination'
campaign. Nearly 40,000 homes were destroyed and 270 of 400 villages
were leveled." It was an ugly attack, Iggy Kim notes: "Torture,
mutilation, gang rape and arbitrary execution were rife. . . a quarter
of the Jeju population had been massacred. The US embassy happily
reported: "The all-out guerilla extermination campaign came to a
virtual end in April with order restored and most rebels and
sympathizers killed, captured, or converted.'" This was the single
greatest masssacre in modern Korean history and a warning of what was
to come in the Korean War. As we will se, Jeju is part of the story
in Today's US asian escalation.

More brutality occurred on mainland Korea. On October 19, dissident
soldiers in the port city of Yosu rose up in opposition to the war in
Jeju. About 2,000 insurgent soldiers took control of the city. By
Oct. 20, a number of nearby towns had also been liberated and the
People's Committee was reinstated as the governing body. People's
courts were established to try police officers, landlords, regime
officials and other supporters of the Rhee dictatorship. This
rebellion was suppressed by a bloodletting, planned and directed by
the US military.

The Korean War followed. S. Brian Willson summarizes the war:

"The Korean War that lasted from June 1950 to July 1953 was an
enlargement of the 1948-50 struggle of Jeju Islanders to preserve
their self-determination from the tyrannical rule of US-supported
Rhee and his tiny cadre of wealthy constituents. Little known is
that the US-imposed division of Korea in 1945 against the wishes of
the vast majority of Koreans was the primary cause of the Korean War
that broke out five years later. The War destroyed by bombing most
cities and villages in Korea north of the 38th Parallel, and many
south of it, while killing four million Koreans - three million
(one-third) of the north's residents and one million of those living
in the south, in addition to killing one million Chinese. This was a
staggering international crime still unrecognized that killed five
million people and permanently separated 10 million Korean families."

Bragging about the massacre, USAF Strategic Air Command head General
Curtis LeMay, who blanket-bombed Japan in World War II and later ran
for vice president with segregationist George Wallace, summed it up
well, "Over a period of three years or so we killed off - what -
twenty percent of the population." Willson corrects LeMay, writing
"it is now believed that the population north of the imposed 38th
Parallel lost nearly a third its population of 8-9 million people
during the 37-month long "hot" war, 1950-1953, perhaps an
unprecedented percentage of mortality suffered by one nation due to
belligerence of another.

Context Today: Korea Targeted, Mock Attacks, Learning from Iraq and
Libya and the Asia Pivot

This historical context results in North Korea taking the threats of
the United States very seriously. It knows the US has been willing to
kill large portions of its population throughout history and has seen
what the US has done to other countries.

In 2002, President George W. Bush labeled North Korea part of the
"axis of evil" along with Iraq and Iran. S. Brian Willson traveled
900 ground miles through six of North Korea's nine provinces, as well
as Pyongyang, the capital, and several other cities, talking with
dozens of people from all walks of life; all wanted to know about the
"axis of evil" speech. He found that North Koreans "simply cannot
understand why the US is so obsessed with them."

Of course, the North Korean government witnessed the "shock and awe"
campaign of bombardments against Iraq and the killing of at least
hundreds of thousands (credible research shows more than 1 million
Iraqis killed, 4.5 million displaced, 1-2 million widows and 5 million
orphans). They saw the brutal killing by hanging of the former US
ally, now turned into an enemy, Saddam Hussein. And, they can look to
the experience of Libya. Libya was an enemy but then began to develop
positive relations with the US. In 2003, Libya halted its program to
build a nuclear bomb in an effort to mend its relations with the US.
Then last year Libya was overthrown in a US-supported war and its
leader Moammar Gadhafi was brutally killed. As Reuters reports, "`The
tragic consequences in those countries which abandoned halfway their
nuclear programs... clearly prove that the DPRK (Democratic People's
Republic of Korea) was very far-sighted and just when it made the
(nuclear) option," North Korea's KCNA news agency said."

The United States stations 28,500 troops in South Korea. In November
2012 the US upgraded its weapons systems and announced an agreement
with Japan that would allow South Korea to bomb anywhere in North
Korea. In June 2012 the Pentagon announced that Gen.l Neil H. Tolley
would be removed as commander of US Special Operations in South Korea
after he revealed to a Japanese foreign affairs publication that
American and South Korean troops had been parachuting into North Korea
on spy missions. US troops and bases are not popular. Protests
erupted in 2002 after two Korean woman were killed and a court martial
found the US soldiers not guilty of negligent manslaughter. Several
pubs and restaurants put up signs saying "Americans Not Welcome Here."
In an August 2005 protest against US troops by 1,100 people, 10 were
injured by police. One month before that, 100 were injured in a
protest. In 2006 protesters occupied land on which the US planned to
expand a base, resulting in a conflict and their eviction followed by
installing barbed wire around the area to protect it from South
Koreans. The South Korean government banned a rally that was expected
to draw more than 10,000 protesters.

South Korea and the US regularly hold military exercises off the
Korean coast, which North Korea describes as planning for an
invasion. The United States claims these exercises are defensive in
nature to assure preparedness. Prior to the recent nuclear test,
Seoul and Washington conducted a joint naval exercise with a US
nuclear submarine off South Korea's east coast, followed by a joint
air force drill as well as live weapon exercises near a disputed sea
boundary between North and South Korea. These drills have gotten more
aggressive during the Obama administration and since the death of Kim
Jong-il, as outlined by geopolitical analyst Jen Alic here:

The first joint military exercises between the US and South Korea
since Kim Jong-il's death suddenly changed their nature, with new
war games including pre-emptive artillery attacks on North Korea.

. . .
lo yeeOn
2017-03-24 04:24:35 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by lo yeeOn
S. Brian Willson traveled 900 ground miles through six of North
Korea's nine provinces, as well as Pyongyang, the capital, and
several other cities, talking with dozens of people from all walks
of life; all wanted to know about the "axis of evil" speech.
He found that North Koreans "simply cannot understand why the US is
so obsessed with them."
North Korea is a failure. They cannot raise food. They jail people and
execute people. They have no electricity.
You're being dishonest again. It's an undeniable fact that the North
Koreans have a lot of trouble raising food and generating electricity.
The North Koreans don't even deny it.
http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/asia/north-korea-its-not-a-problem-that-country-goes-dark-at-night-10033200.html
How is it that you came to the conclusion that i am less than truthful?
"You're being dishonest again. ..."

It's a spurious accusation, as always, from you against me or others
you disagree with. You used to level this type of ad hominem
"you're disingenuous (or dishonest) again"
against ltlee1 because he posted pro-China messages.

But since I came along to frequently rebut your crazy hatred toward
China and North Korea, you've been directing this kind of fake, false
accusations against me instead.

By saying the word "again", you are trying to spread the propaganda -
a false one - that I am a serial offender at "being dishonest". But
you never had a shred of evidence. Nor this time!

First, are you Demosthenes? I was asking Demosthenes to provide some
citations so that we could decide for ourselves whether the sweeping
assertion he made against NK was true. Whoever Demosthenes is, he
didn't respond to me while you provided nothing and called it evidence
that NK "has no electricity" (a part of Demosthenes's charge).

If you are Demosthenes, then I'll understand that you equate one night
as equal to a state which is simply always true, which is pretty
stupid given that rstxyzw said you have a Ph.D. in control
engineering. (Even in the very prosperous area around here we
sometimes lose power; and one of the problems for getting high tech
investment in our country instead of, say, East Asia, is the low
quality of our power mains, thanks to years of postponing
infrastructure maintenance, let alone enhancement, in favor of
pursuing the sorts of wars you recommend.)

Tsk, tsk!

So may be you might enlighten us as to whether bmoore and Demosthenes
are identical - so that in the future I know how to respond to the
latter if I have a need to! The Demosthenes who posted false stuff
about NK is quite unlike his ancient namesake, I fear.

In any case, according to your (bmoore's) citation, it was the story of
"a satellite photo of one night in darkened Pyongyang makes NK's
detractors, aka, regime change advocates, overjoyed",
isn't it?

Incidentally, I wasn't aware of this story first of all. But even if
I was, I wouldn't have equated a one night thing as a simple present
condition!

There is so much negative propaganda against NK that this kind of
report carries no weight in terms of my sympathy for the Korean
people. They don't deserve to be bombed, not now, and not in the
1940s and 50s - just as the Serbs did not deserve to be bombed and
just as the Afghans, the Iraqis, the Yemenis, and the Libyans did (and
do) not deserve to be bombed just because in Washington and London,
people are thirsting to slay more monsters all the time.

Even if NK has an electricity shortage, it is perfectly
understandable. You know why! The West has been imposing severe
economic sanctions against NK for decades. So what can a reasonable
mind expect?

Economic sanctions is a blunt instrument, as they say. What would you
expect such a blunt instrument to have done to the country? And if
they have to choose between food for people and electricity to impress
the West, they were doing the right thing by feeding their people
first.

Now, what did I do that was so "dishonest again"?

I was trying to rebut the two major assertions Demosthenes made:
"They cannot raise food" and "They have no electricity".

"They cannot raise food"? BBC News has a lot of coverage of NK. I
didn't see hunger on the faces in the photos accompanying their
coverage.

I just checked back on some articles that talked about NK and here is
a good one from the UK Telegraph with a lot photos. Famines? They
have the best looking people many, many countries on this planet can
envy. And I just hate to see that they will be the victims of our
bombs!

http://www.businessinsider.com/north-korea-is-undergoing-some-startling-developments-2015-4

"They have no electricity." What? How could they play a huge classic
like a Bruckner Symphony, as well as other classics?

The following excerpt tells a truth about that country:

North Koreans and South Koreans are alike, they all love music like no
on else on this planet except the Russians. And that's why the Polish
or German conductor went back to NK six (6) times to make music with
them. And I recall the BBC audio I heard of some of it, and it was an
excellent orchestral specimen.

No question, they were making real music. Truth is beauty and beauty
truth! How could they afford to be regularly making music together
if they didn't have electricity?

If they chose to save electricity for better use like making music or
developing software, something they are also good at, than to impress
the West, then they were just being wise, especially under constant
threat from the West.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-20773542

Alexander Liebreich is the chief conductor of the Polish National
Radio Symphony Orchestra and principal conductor of the Munich
Chamber Orchestra

He has established a reputation for pursuing unusual projects. In
2002, he visited North and South Korea together with the Junge
Deutsche Philharmonie where they gave the first Korean performances
of Bruckner Symphony No. 8. He has since returned to North Korea six
times

The 2005 documentary Pyongyang Crescendo captures his teaching
experiences there

So, it seems there is no evidence that Demothenes' statements are
true. That seems to be why you come and make your spurious accusation
about me.

You've been doing this for a long time, and you don't seem to be very
">Given your defense of not only Saddam, but Kadaffy and the North
Post by lo yeeOn
Korean monsters, you deserve to have the shit beaten out of you."
And that's how good your propaganda work for regime change was and is!

And the objective of your propaganda work is obviously to make North
Koreans victims of our bombs like the Iraqis and the Libyans have been
made victims of our bombs. And that's what you want to see coming to
pass?

But in effect, every country who has seen the kind of line you put
forth lumping Saddam, Qaddafi, and "the North Korean monsteres"
together and has been in the slightest way in the State Department's
cross-hairs will have been warned:

As Reuters reports, "`The tragic consequences in those countries
which abandoned halfway their nuclear programs... clearly prove
that the DPRK (Democratic People's Republic of Korea) was very
far-sighted and just when it made the (nuclear) option," North
Korea's KCNA news agency said."

That's in Kevin Zeese and Margaret Flowers famous article entitled
"The U.S. and North Korea: Will the Real Aggressor Please Stand Down!"

Zeese and Flowers' tells a much more reasonable and believable story
about North Korea.

If the United States will treat North Korea on an equal footing like
two sovereign nations on this planet, then everybody will be happy.
But as long as the US and its western allies are planning to eliminate
NK like they did Iraq, using violence, I expect a continuation of your
ad homenim against people who carry a message of peace.

Finally, I also agree with the NK statement that flashy night lights
aren't such a great act to follow, especially in an era of global
climate change. Intelligent human beings know that activities that
waste energy and produce more CO2 than necessary aren't a virtue.
Rather they are sins and vices.

lo yeeOn

S. Brian Willson traveled 900 ground miles through six of North
Korea's nine provinces, as well as Pyongyang, the capital, and
several other cities, talking with dozens of people from all walks
of life; all wanted to know about the "axis of evil" speech.

He found that North Koreans "simply cannot understand why the US is
so obsessed with them."
North Korea is a failure. They cannot raise food. They jail people and
execute people. They have no electricity.
If you want to be taken seriously, cite some sources so we can read
and decide for ourselves. No electricity? Then they can't have an
orchestra and get together and play a concert. A certain Polish or
German conductor has been cited by the BBC news for repeatedly going
back to North Korea for musical purposes. If they "have no
electricity" as you claimed, how do they rehearse and play a concert
together? Most conductors conduct with scores in front of them and
the musicians do not play ensemble music by heart. Also, all the
pictures from the BBC news I have seen show North Koreans looking
strong and healthy and their women looking very pretty, with a more
chiseled look than other Far East Asian women. You can't be starving
and looking good at the same time!
North Korean guards kill Chinese and Communists do nothing.
This is sensationalism. If it was a random crime, it could occur
anywhere on this planet. If it is a systematic thing, the Chinese
wouldn't stand for it. (Cf. the rape cases in South Korea and Japan's
Okinawa leveled against US soldiers.)

Lastly, if the propaganda that "North Korea or whoever is ruling it is
a monster" holds any currency for the US politicians, it's only
because getting into China is Washington's long term goal - its real
aim. China has stuff and North Korea doesn't. Also, once the US has
access to NK, Russia is not far behind to see a foreign invasion.
That's the beginning and the end of the North Korea story.

The US should negotiate a peace treaty with NK and forget about war
with it. We have killed too many Korean people already.

Now Let's read Kevin Zeese and Margaret Flowers'
"The U.S. and North Korea: Will the Real Aggressor Please Stand Down!"

[The] historical context results in North Korea taking the threats
of the United States very seriously. It knows the US has been
willing to kill large portions of its population throughout history
and has seen what the US has done to other countries.

In 2002, President George W. Bush labeled North Korea part of the
"axis of evil" along with Iraq and Iran. S. Brian Willson traveled
900 ground miles through six of North Korea's nine provinces, as
well as Pyongyang, the capital, and several other cities, talking
with dozens of people from all walks of life; all wanted to know
about the "axis of evil" speech. He found that North Koreans
"simply cannot understand why the US is so obsessed with them."

Of course, the North Korean government witnessed the "shock and awe"
campaign of bombardments against Iraq and the killing of at least
hundreds of thousands . . .

Should we have to be reminded of the hundreds of thousands of innocent
victims of Hiroshima and Nagasaki who lived and died not far from the
homeland of the Koreans, north or south?

Did these victims of our atom bombs offend us Americans in any way
that could ever justify their horrible and painful deaths?

So, who are the monsters? Comparing George W Bush and his cabal and
the Kims and their henchmen, the choice is clear, if it is a binary
forced choice kind of answer you're asked to provide.

lo yeeOn

--------

North Korea and the United States: Will the Real Aggressor Please
Stand Down?

Kevin Zeese and Margaret Flowers, March 05, 2013

http://antiwar.com/blog/2013/03/05/north-korea-and-the-united-states-will-the-real-aggressor-please-stand-down/

Near the end of World War II, as Japan was weakened, Korean "People's
Committees" formed all over the country and Korean exiles returned
from China, the US and Russia to prepare for independence and
democratic rule. On September 6, 1945, these disparate forces and
representatives of the people's committees proclaimed a Korean
People's Republic (the KPR) with a progressive agenda of land reform,
rent control, an eight-hour work day and minimum wage among its
27-point program.

But the KPR was prevented from becoming a reality. Instead, after
World War II and without Korean representation, the US quite
arbitrarily decided with Russia, China and England, to divide Korea
into two nations "temporarily" as part of its decolonization. The
powers agreed that Japan should lose all of its colonies and that in
"due course" Korea would be free. Korea was divided on the 38th
parallel. The US made sure to keep the capital, Seoul, and key ports.
Essentially, the US took as much of Korea as it thought the Russians
would allow. This division planted the seeds of the Korean War,
causing a five-year revolution and counter-revolution that escalated
into the Korean War.

Initially, the South Koreans welcomed the United States, but US
Gen. John Hodge, the military governor of South Korea working under
Gen. Douglas MacArthur, quickly brought Koreans who had cooperated
with the Japanese during occupation into the government and shut out
Koreans seeking democracy. He refused to meet with representatives of
the KPR and banned the party, working instead with the right wing
Korean Democratic Party - made up of landlords, land owners, business
interests and pro-Japanese collaborators.

Shut out of politics, Koreans who sought an independent democratic
state took to other methods and a mass uprising occurred. A strike
against the railroads in September 1946 by 8,000 railway workers in
Pusan quickly grew into a general strike of workers and students in
all of the South's major cities. The US military arrested strike
leaders en masse. In Taegu, on Oct. 1, huge riots occurred after
police smashed picket lines and fired into a crowd of student
demonstrators, killing three and wounding scores. In Yongchon, on
Oct. 3, 10,000 people attacked the police station and killed more than
40 police, including the county chief. Some 20 landlords and
pro-Japanese officials were also killed. A few days later, the US
military declared martial law to crush the uprising. They fired into
large crowds of demonstrators in numerous cities and towns, killing
and wounding an unknown number of people.

Syngman Rhee, an exile who had lived in the US for 40 years, was
returned to Korea on MacArthur's personal plane. He initially allied
with left leaders to form a government approved of by the US. Then in
1947, he dispensed with his "left" allies by assassinating their
leaders, Kim Ku and Kim Kyu-Shik. Rhee consolidated power and the US
pushed for United Nations-sponsored elections in May 1948 to put a
legal imprimatur on the divided Koreas. Rhee was elected at 71 years
old in an election boycotted by most parties who saw it as sham. He
came to power in the midst of an insurgency.

On Jeju Island, the largest Korean island lying in a strategic
location in the Korea Strait, there continued to be protests against
the US military government. It was one of the last areas where
people's committees continued to exist. Gen. Hodge told Congress Jeju
was a truly communal area that is peacefully controlled by the
People's Committee," but he organized its extermination in a
scorched-earth attack.

In September, Rhee's new government launched a massive
counterinsurgency operation under US command. S. Brian Willson
reports it resulted in the killing of "60,000 Islanders, with another
40,000 desperately fleeing in boats to Japan. Thus, one-third of its
residents were either murdered or fled during the 'extermination'
campaign. Nearly 40,000 homes were destroyed and 270 of 400 villages
were leveled." It was an ugly attack, Iggy Kim notes: "Torture,
mutilation, gang rape and arbitrary execution were rife. . . a quarter
of the Jeju population had been massacred. The US embassy happily
reported: "The all-out guerilla extermination campaign came to a
virtual end in April with order restored and most rebels and
sympathizers killed, captured, or converted.'" This was the single
greatest masssacre in modern Korean history and a warning of what was
to come in the Korean War. As we will se, Jeju is part of the story
in Today's US asian escalation.

More brutality occurred on mainland Korea. On October 19, dissident
soldiers in the port city of Yosu rose up in opposition to the war in
Jeju. About 2,000 insurgent soldiers took control of the city. By
Oct. 20, a number of nearby towns had also been liberated and the
People's Committee was reinstated as the governing body. People's
courts were established to try police officers, landlords, regime
officials and other supporters of the Rhee dictatorship. This
rebellion was suppressed by a bloodletting, planned and directed by
the US military.

The Korean War followed. S. Brian Willson summarizes the war:

"The Korean War that lasted from June 1950 to July 1953 was an
enlargement of the 1948-50 struggle of Jeju Islanders to preserve
their self-determination from the tyrannical rule of US-supported
Rhee and his tiny cadre of wealthy constituents. Little known is
that the US-imposed division of Korea in 1945 against the wishes of
the vast majority of Koreans was the primary cause of the Korean War
that broke out five years later. The War destroyed by bombing most
cities and villages in Korea north of the 38th Parallel, and many
south of it, while killing four million Koreans - three million
(one-third) of the north's residents and one million of those living
in the south, in addition to killing one million Chinese. This was a
staggering international crime still unrecognized that killed five
million people and permanently separated 10 million Korean families."

Bragging about the massacre, USAF Strategic Air Command head General
Curtis LeMay, who blanket-bombed Japan in World War II and later ran
for vice president with segregationist George Wallace, summed it up
well, "Over a period of three years or so we killed off - what -
twenty percent of the population." Willson corrects LeMay, writing
"it is now believed that the population north of the imposed 38th
Parallel lost nearly a third its population of 8-9 million people
during the 37-month long "hot" war, 1950-1953, perhaps an
unprecedented percentage of mortality suffered by one nation due to
belligerence of another.

Context Today: Korea Targeted, Mock Attacks, Learning from Iraq and
Libya and the Asia Pivot

This historical context results in North Korea taking the threats of
the United States very seriously. It knows the US has been willing to
kill large portions of its population throughout history and has seen
what the US has done to other countries.

In 2002, President George W. Bush labeled North Korea part of the
"axis of evil" along with Iraq and Iran. S. Brian Willson traveled
900 ground miles through six of North Korea's nine provinces, as well
as Pyongyang, the capital, and several other cities, talking with
dozens of people from all walks of life; all wanted to know about the
"axis of evil" speech. He found that North Koreans "simply cannot
understand why the US is so obsessed with them."

Of course, the North Korean government witnessed the "shock and awe"
campaign of bombardments against Iraq and the killing of at least
hundreds of thousands (credible research shows more than 1 million
Iraqis killed, 4.5 million displaced, 1-2 million widows and 5 million
orphans). They saw the brutal killing by hanging of the former US
ally, now turned into an enemy, Saddam Hussein. And, they can look to
the experience of Libya. Libya was an enemy but then began to develop
positive relations with the US. In 2003, Libya halted its program to
build a nuclear bomb in an effort to mend its relations with the US.
Then last year Libya was overthrown in a US-supported war and its
leader Moammar Gadhafi was brutally killed. As Reuters reports, "`The
tragic consequences in those countries which abandoned halfway their
nuclear programs... clearly prove that the DPRK (Democratic People's
Republic of Korea) was very far-sighted and just when it made the
(nuclear) option," North Korea's KCNA news agency said."

The United States stations 28,500 troops in South Korea. In November
2012 the US upgraded its weapons systems and announced an agreement
with Japan that would allow South Korea to bomb anywhere in North
Korea. In June 2012 the Pentagon announced that Gen.l Neil H. Tolley
would be removed as commander of US Special Operations in South Korea
after he revealed to a Japanese foreign affairs publication that
American and South Korean troops had been parachuting into North Korea
on spy missions. US troops and bases are not popular. Protests
erupted in 2002 after two Korean woman were killed and a court martial
found the US soldiers not guilty of negligent manslaughter. Several
pubs and restaurants put up signs saying "Americans Not Welcome Here."
In an August 2005 protest against US troops by 1,100 people, 10 were
injured by police. One month before that, 100 were injured in a
protest. In 2006 protesters occupied land on which the US planned to
expand a base, resulting in a conflict and their eviction followed by
installing barbed wire around the area to protect it from South
Koreans. The South Korean government banned a rally that was expected
to draw more than 10,000 protesters.

South Korea and the US regularly hold military exercises off the
Korean coast, which North Korea describes as planning for an
invasion. The United States claims these exercises are defensive in
nature to assure preparedness. Prior to the recent nuclear test,
Seoul and Washington conducted a joint naval exercise with a US
nuclear submarine off South Korea's east coast, followed by a joint
air force drill as well as live weapon exercises near a disputed sea
boundary between North and South Korea. These drills have gotten more
aggressive during the Obama administration and since the death of Kim
Jong-il, as outlined by geopolitical analyst Jen Alic here:

The first joint military exercises between the US and South Korea
since Kim Jong-il's death suddenly changed their nature, with new
war games including pre-emptive artillery attacks on North Korea.

. . .

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